MH Equipment Blog


  • ReSale Feature of the Week

    The past two weeks, we have been featuring a piece of used equipment on our Facebook Fan Page. Here is today’s ReSale Feature of the Week:

    2008 Hyster S40FTS

    If interested or want more information, fill out a contact form or call our Davenport Branch at (563) 381-9989. For more ReSale options, visit our website. Please consider subscribing to our blog if you’re interested in learning more about our used equipment. [slideshow]

  • Meet Erik James

     Erik James is our newest Material Handling Specialist at our Columbus,Ohio Branch. He just recently joined us in February of this year, so I guess he can technically still be considered a ‘newbie’.  Erik was recruited to MH Equipment by Brian Wolfe, our Construction Equipment Specialist in the Cincinnati area, from Hilti, Inc. where he was a Civil Specialist selling civil engineering equipment to the construction industry.

    During his time at MH Equipment, Erik says that the thing he likes most about working for MH is the people he gets to work with on a daily basis; and he says that his most memorable experience thus far was his first Hyster sale to a Columbus trucking company.

    When he’s not working, Erik likes to spend time with his beautiful wife Bergen Lynn and their two children, Becket who is 3 and Zoe who is 1. Together they like spending time at the pool or Buckeye Lake (Ohio’s oldest state park!). Erik is also considered the ‘get-together’ guy in his social circle – frequently organizing and planning social events. Finally, when he’s not organizing social events or spending time with family, you can find Erik snow skiing or watching his favorite baseball team, the Cleveland Indians, play ball. (When asked why they were his favorite team, Erik simply replied “Because I’m a glutton for punishment….” Ouch.)

    Erik says that Kurt Cobain is the one person in history that he would like to have dinner with. “There really isn’t a deep meaning behind wanting to have dinner with Kurt Cobain, I just grew up listening to his music and he was very influential in my childhood.  I’d like to ask him what was so wrong in his life that he needed to end it.  Most musicians love music, make good money and entertain people, or want to change the way society feels and thinks about issues at hand…he accomplished all three during and after his life.”

    Please join me in welcoming aboard Erik James to the MH family – we look forward to his many years at MH Equipment!

  • A Forklift Safety Awareness Quiz – Answers!

    How familiar are you with forklifts and their safe operation? Take this quiz and find out. (Answers below in RED)


    1.) It is very easy to tip over on ramps and sloped surfaces whether the forklift is loaded or unloaded.
    a.) True. b.) False.

    2.) When driving on ramps with a grade of 10 percent or more with a loaded forklift, you must always keep the load uphill, even if it means driving in reverse down the ramp.
    a.) True. b.) False.

    3.) Because a forklift weighs more, it is much easier to brake to a stop than an automobile.
    a.) True. b.) False.

    4.) A forklift driver must always look…
    a.) In the mirrors.
    b.) Around his/her load.
    c.) In the direction of travel.
    d.) Forward.

    5.) What should you do when you approach an intersection?
    a.) Slow down and sound the horn.
    b.) Check for hazards by leaning out of the cab.
    c.) Turn slowly and smoothly.
    d.) Get through as quickly as possible.

    6.) To lift people using a forklift, the operator must…
    a.) Lift people with bare forks.
    b.) Use a pallet to provide a platform.
    c.) Move a truck near a wall for fall protection.
    d.) None of the above.

    7.) When forward visibility is obstructed or blocked…
    a.) Look around the load.
    b.) Proceed forward slowly and with due caution.
    c.) Drive in reverse.
    d.) None of the above.

    8.) Never enter a trailer or railroad car unless…
    a.) The watchman is present.
    b.) The forklift’s fuel tank and battery are fully charged.
    c.) The trailer or railcar is locked in place with wheel chocks.
    d.) There is a spotter inside the trailer or railroad car.

    9.) A forklift operator’s first concern should be…
    a.) Increasing the speed of loading and unloading.
    b.) Making sure the vehicle is in safe working condition.
    c.) Checking shift changes for the load/unload schedule.
    d.) Stabilizing the forks on all trucks used in a shift.

    10.) Which of the following is a warning sign that the forklift may need to be taken out of service and repaired?
    a.) Leaks for the fuel system.
    b.) A brake pedal that feels spongy.
    c.) Exhaust fumes that make you feel sick.
    d.) All of the above.

    How many wrong answers are permissible? In the workplace: zero.
    Whenever forklift drivers perform their duties incorrectly, such incidents open the door to accidents, injuries or death, which in turn can lead to workers’ compensation expenses, lost productivity, raised insurance premiums, lowered employee morale, and penalties from OSHA.

    “When every forklift operator at your company has passed a training and certification program that observes OSHA regulations,” said Mr. Mangan, “you’ve taken a major step toward fostering a safer workplace.”

    Thank you to MANCOMM Video Series trainer’s instruction manual for these throught provoking questions. Call MH Equipment to learn more about our Operator Safety Training classes at 888-564-2191 or contact us at training@mhequipment.com.

    Remember to Be Safe in the Moment!

  • A Forklift Safety Awareness Quiz

    How familiar are you with forklifts and their safe operation? Take this quiz and find out. (Answers will be provided on tomorrow’s blog posting!)

      
    1.) It is very easy to tip over on ramps and sloped surfaces whether the forklift is loaded or unloaded.
    a.)  True.    b.) False.
     
    2.) When driving on ramps with a grade of 10 percent or more with a loaded forklift, you must always keep the load uphill, even if it means driving in reverse down the ramp.
    a.)  True.    b.) False.
     
    3.) Because a forklift weighs more, it is much easier to brake to a stop than an automobile.
    a.)  True.    b.) False.
     
    4.) A forklift driver must always look…
    a.) In the mirrors.
    b.) Around his/her load.
    c.) In the direction of travel.
    d.) Forward.
     
    5.) What should you do when you approach an intersection?
    a.) Slow down and sound the horn.
    b.) Check for hazards by leaning out of the cab.
    c.) Turn slowly and smoothly.
    d.) Get through as quickly as possible.
     
    6.) To lift people using a forklift, the operator must…
    a.) Lift people with bare forks.
    b.) Use a pallet to provide a platform.
    c.) Move a truck near a wall for fall protection.
    d.) None of the above.
     
    7.) When forward visibility is obstructed or blocked…
    a.) Look around the load.
    b.) Proceed forward slowly and with due caution.
    c.) Drive in reverse.
    d.) None of the above.
     
    8.) Never enter a trailer or railroad car unless…
    a.) The watchman is present.
    b.) The forklift’s fuel tank and battery are fully charged.
    c.) The trailer or railcar is locked in place with wheel chocks.
    d.) There is a spotter inside the trailer or railroad car.
     
    9.) A forklift operator’s first concern should be…
    a.) Increasing the speed of loading and unloading.
    b.) Making sure the vehicle is in safe working condition.
    c.) Checking shift changes for the load/unload schedule.
    d.) Stabilizing the forks on all trucks used in a shift.
     
    10.) Which of the following is a warning sign that the forklift may need to be taken out of service and repaired?
    a.) Leaks for the fuel system.
    b.) A brake pedal that feels spongy.
    c.) Exhaust fumes that make you feel sick.
    d.) All of the above.
     
    How many wrong answers are permissible? In the workplace: zero.
    Whenever forklift drivers perform their duties incorrectly, such incidents open the door to accidents, injuries or death, which in turn can lead to workers’ compensation expenses, lost productivity, raised insurance premiums, lowered employee morale, and penalties from OSHA.

    “When every forklift operator at your company has passed a training and certification program that observes OSHA regulations,” said Mr. Mangan, “you’ve taken a major step toward fostering a safer workplace.”

    Thank you to MANCOMM Video Series trainer’s instruction manual for these throught provoking questions. Call MH Equipment to learn more about our Operator Safety Training classes at 888-564-2191 or contact us at training@mhequipment.com.

    Remember to Be Safe in the Moment!

  • Be Safe in the Moment!

    It is important to be Safe in the Moment to avoid accidents and injuries. By following the safety tips below you can maintain a safe work environment.


    Focus on the Task at hand
    !

    1. Set the stage:  Have all your tools set up in your work station so you do not have to continually go searching for them.

    2. One task at a time:  Work on one item at a time and put everything else away. If you are working on a computer close all windows but the one you are working on.

    3. Envision the outcome:  Picture the end result in your mind, and work your way back. What do you have to do, how you do it, and where you need to start.

    4. Eliminate outside distractions:  Keep your workspace clean.

    5. Be present:  Think about what you are doing and not the deadlines or the church picnic on the weekend.
    http://EzineArticles.com/2930242

     
    REMEMBER
    Focus on being Safe in the Moment. Many accidents occur because of carelessness. By applying the principles above you can stay safe!

  • ReSale Feature of the Week

    FOR SALE: 2008 Hyster E40HSD

    Call  888-564-2191 if interested or fill out an online contact form. For new and used equipment, visit our website.

  • Meet: Matt Guye

    Each Friday, our goal is to highlight one employee within the MH Equipment family. This week, we want you to meet Matt Guye, our Big Trucks and Speciality Equipment Salesman from the Cincinnati Branch.

    How long have you worked for the company and which branch do you work at?

    I have worked at MH Equipment – since Jan. 2003, and our predecessor (Hyster MidEast) since Nov. 2001.

    What did you do before you came to MH?

    I previously worked for a moving and storage company and prior to that another material handling company focused on Dock Equipment Sales.  Overall, I have been in the material handling and logistics business for nearly 20 years. 

    What has been your most rewarding, satisfying or proudest sales experience you’ve had since joining MH?

    One of my first used equipment sales was my most rewarding experience.  We had a great price on a well equipped pneumatic truck.  Then the customer also asked for a custom paint color, which we were able to provide as well.  The truck sits outside at the customer’s location and I still drive by and show it to the kids!

    Tell us about your family.

    My wife and I have been married for nearly 18 years.  We have five kids from sixteen down to four.  That keeps us busy.  We enjoy outdoor and sporting activities.  The kids play – or played – soccer, basketball, football, baseball, softball, and t-ball.  My wife’s favorite sport is swimming in the summer – all five kids are at the same meet, so we can see everyone’s event. 

    Our family adventures are legendary and have included nature hikes through the woods, through marshes, and sand dunes, plus bike trips, canoeing, etc.  Some of these have turned out better than others!      

    What are your specialties, or your area of expertise?

    Most of my duties have been as a Material Handling Specialist with key account and fleet management responsibilities.   These have given me the opportunity to get an in-depth understanding of our customers’ leasing arrangements, maintenance requirements, and replacement considerations.

    Recently, I have been named to the Big Trucks and Specialty Equipment position, which is allowing me to parlay that experience into a new area.  

     What are your hobbies?

    I run occasionally – though not as often as I should!  I did complete a couple of marathons and I annually run the community 10K on July 4th.  It’s hilly and usually hot.

    I’m also a pretty big sports fan and still go see my high school football team once or twice a year, plus occasional Notre Dame football, Xavier basketball, and Cincinnati Reds games.    

    Favorite food?

    Ice Cream – though I don’t turn down much.  My wife makes some really good homemade pizza, too.

    What one person in history would you like to have dinner with?

    I hate trying to pinpoint an answer to this, but if I had to narrow it down, I would have to say Jesus Christ.  I can think of no other single person that had a greater impact on our civilization, so there would be some really cool “history” questions to ask.  Add to that the spiritual dimension and I would have plenty to discuss.  I only hope I would not get intimidated or tongue tied and that we’d have an intelligent conversation! 

    What do you like most about working for MH?

    I really like the people!  I enjoy the fact that MH Equipment’s Vision, Mission and Values put people first and that the leadership team aspires to demonstrate that “People Matter”.  It’s very empowering to have the company’s priorities aligned with my own – or more specifically where mine should be. 

    And finally, something unique that most people don’t know about you?

    In 1984, I played in the first high school football game in the then Hoosier Dome.  We were the on the undercard the night before the Saturday dedication game between Purdue and Notre Dame, which I also got to see.  I think we played there before the Colts did.

  • Prevent Injuries and Cuts!

    Cuts are a common form of injury in the workplace; HOWEVER, they can be avoided if you focus on what you are doing and ASK, “Is what I am doing now being safe in the moment?” Tools, parts, and machinery can have sharp edges so you have to be careful when working with them, but you can take measures to protect yourself from being injured.

    Follow these Safety tips:

     

  • Cincinnati Hi-Lite

    The Cincinnati branch has a long history in the Cincinnati, Northern Kentucky and South East Indiana markets. MH Equipment Cincinnati originally opened in 1934 when the Al Bode and Ray Finn families came together to form the Bode Finn Company.

    Prior to becoming the Bode Finn Company, the Finn family made Aluminum Ice Wagon Bodies used to deliver ice to families and businesses to refrigerate food. Al Bode’s Grandfather made wagons used in the circus and they can be seen today at the Ringling Museum of Art in Saratoga, Florida.

    The Bode Finn Company was purchased a number of times in the late ninety’s and finally became MH Equipment in September of 2003. MH Equipment Cincinnati currently has 48 employees, housing employees from the following departments Parts, Service, Rental, New, Used, Training, Railking, JCB Construction, Marketing and one President.

    Cincinnati is one of the few branches designated as a re-build center. We are equipped with a state of the art paint booth which enables us to safely and professionally prepare used equipment from a mechanical and cosmetic standpoint. It is not uncommon for a customer to comment that a completed piece of used equipment looks like new. Our used equipment technicians, Jeff Cutter and Tim Whittington, have been providing MH Equipment salesmen and customers with quality equipment for the past six years.

    The Cincinnati branch is fortunate to administer the General Motors parts contract which has helped to provide the branch and company with good net profit. Mark Hoerst and Shanell Jones have done a great job managing this account along with their other everyday duties. They process parts orders and bi-monthly invoices for 62 General Motors plants in the United States, Canada and Mexico. We are currently looking forward to a contract extension with General Motors to take us into 2011.

    From a personal stand point, many Cincinnati branch employees are living a culture of giving back to their local communities. Cincinnati employees have participated in the Right to Life, Hospice of Hamilton, donations to St. Josephs Orphanage, the local food pantry, American Cancer Society, participated in building improvements at local churches, volunteering as a football director, assistant soccer coach, assistant baseball coach, and much more. It is obvious that Cincinnati branch employees believe in People, Passion and Purpose.

    When you get a chance to visit the Cincinnati branch you may also want to plan your trip around the following places of interest –

    Kings Island, The Beach Water Park, Cincinnati Zoo, Newport Aquarium, Natural History Museum, Cincinnati Art Museum, The Creation Museum,  Krohn Conservatory, River Downs, Riverboat Casinos and much more. After a day of fun you can dine at one of following restaurants which are well known Cincinnati eateries – Montgomery Inn Ribs, Skyline Chili, Larosa’s Pizza and Graters Ice Cream.

    There are many benefits to living and working in Cincinnati but for families with children, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital ranks right up at the top of the list. The Cincinnati’s Children’s Hospital Medical Center is one of only eight pediatric hospitals in the United States to be included in the Honor Roll in U.S. News and World Reports 2010 Best Children’s Hospitals. When it comes to your children’s medical care, Cincinnati is the place to live.

    We look forward to 2011 and hope that all MH Equipment employees have a safe and happy New Year!

  • Preventing Shoulder Injuries!

    A shoulder sprain is stretching or partial tearing of the ligaments and capsule that support the shoulder, specifically, the glenohumeral joint. Ligaments are strong bands of tissue that connect bones to each other. The glenohumeral joint is the meeting of the upper arm bone, humerus, and the cup of the shoulder blade.

     Causes of Shoulder injury:

    Holding any muscle in one position too long can cause muscle strain. For example:

    *If a typist’s keyboard is too high, the shoulders must be kept in a raised position. Correction: The keyboard should be low enough to allow the shoulders to be down and to be relaxed while typing.

    *While driving, if the steering wheel is too high or far away, the shoulders may be placed in an awkward position. Correction: Adjust the seat closer and lower the steering wheel to put the shoulders in a relaxed position.

    *Carrying a backpack or computer bag over one shoulder for a long time. Correction: Take time to stretch out the neck and shoulder and carry with your hand instead.

    Slouching

    *Muscles in the upper back (between the shoulder blades) may become strained as a result of slouching for long periods of time. Correction: Practice good body mechanics and good posture. 

    Falling on outstretched arm, forced twisting of the arm, or a blow to the shoulder

    *Correction:  Practice good housekeeping, check mats and rugs for trip hazards.


    Technician Precautions

       • Practice proper lifting techniques for lifting, moving, reaching, bending, etc
       • Drink plenty of water esp. in hot weather. Water lubricates the joints
       • Practice good housekeeping to prevent trips and falls. Cords picked up? Loose stairs?
       • Warm up and stretching exercises before engaging in strenuous activity
       • Use proper extensions on tools whenever possible to avoid straining to reach
       • Use a ladder instead of trying to reach heavy items over head

    Safety is important and it’s everyone’s responsibilty.

  • ReSale Feature of the Week

       FOR SALE: 2007 Hyster H50FT

       Call  563-381-9989 if interested or fill out an online contact form. For new and used equipment, visit our website.

  • Heat Safe, Drink Water

    A couple of weeks ago, we talked about how to avoid heat-related illness. With temperatures soaring and hot summer months upon us, it is important to make sure you are drinking enough water to avoid dehydration. The brain is composed of 85% water and dehydration causes energy generation in the brain to decrease. That doesn’t sound too good, does it? In order to think better, focus and stay sharp for the tasks at hand, you need to drink plenty of water.

    The human body is primarily composed of water. Water plays an enormous role in how well our body functions. Water increases not only the quality but the length of our lives.

    Water helps to:

    Safety check:

    Stay hydrated, stay safe!

  • ReSale Feature of the Week

    FOR SALE: 2000 S50XM-4

    [slideshow] If interested, please call our Danville Branch at 217-443-6965 or fill out an online contact form for more information on the equipment. For more new and used material handling equipment, visit our website.

  • Shakin’ Things Up

    A topic that we haven’t covered yet on our weekly safety posts is vibration safety. Vibration can occur from a pneumatic drill, chainsaw, tractor seat or factory floor. In order to explain the effects of vibration on human bodies, we have split vibration safety into two categories.

    Vibration disease occurs after prolonged exposure to either high or low-frequency vibration.

    Ask yourself these questions to check for vibration issues:

    For other vibration health effects, click here.

  • Top F-I-V-E!

    You know by know that MH Equipment is BIG into safety. We talk about it a lot, around here and you might be wondering which branches have the highest safety records. You’ve seen posts about some of our branches reaching momentous milestones and achieving safety awards…so out of 27 locations, the top 5 branches as far as safety goes are:

    A big “Thank You” goes out to all employees working within these top 5 branches for being Safe in the Moment.

    [note: safe days recorded on 05-12-11]